News and Publications


Notice of Award

Published:
Dec 02 2022

2022 Chemo-Sero Therapeutic Research Institute Grant




Professor Mamiko Sakata-Yanagimoto (坂田-柳元 麻実子), who heads up the Advanced Hemato Oncology Laboratory in the TMRC Integrated Research Division, was selected for the Japan 2022 Chemo-Sero Therapeutic Research Institute Grant. The funding will go to support her lab's important research elucidating the pathogenesis of age pre-related malignant lymphoma.

"Kaketsuken" Press Release (PDF In Japanese language)
TMRC Integrated Research Division - Advanced Hemato Oncology Lab

Publication

Published:
Dec 01 2022

The adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr116 is essential to maintain the skeletal muscle stem cell pool.

Highlights:
• Quiescent muscle stem cells express the adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr116
• Gpr116-deficient muscle stem cells are incapable of maintaining quiescence
• The GPR116 Stachel agonist peptide prevents MuSC activation
• GPR116 signaling is mediated in part by nuclear activity of β-arrestin1



Skeletal muscle is populated with a reservoir of quiescent muscle stem cells (MuSCs), which regenerate the tissue after injury. Here, we show that the adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor Gpr116 is essential for long-term maintenance of the MuSC pool. Quiescent MuSCs express high levels of Gpr116, which is rapidly downregulated upon MuSC activation. MuSCs deficient for Gpr116 exhibit progressive depletion over time and are defective in self-renewal. Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors contain an agonistic peptide sequence, called the “Stachel” sequence, within their long N-terminal ectodomains. Stimulation of MuSCs with the GPR116 Stachel peptide delays MuSC activation and differentiation. Stachel peptide stimulation of GPR116 leads to strong interaction with β-arrestins. Stimulation of GPR116 increases the nuclear localization of β-arrestin1, where it interacts with cAMP response element binding protein to regulate gene expression. Altogether, we propose a model by which GPR116 maintains the MuSC pool via nuclear functions of β-arrestin1.

Cell Reports    
Volume 41, ISSUE 7, 111645, November 15, 2022
    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2022.111645

Research Outline (PDF In Japanese language)

Event

Published:
Posted 10 November 2022

Digital Medicine Strategy Division - Fourth Seminar Session


Transborder Medical Research Center

Digital Medicine Strategy Division

Online Zoom Event, November 30th, 2022 (Wednesday),
18:00 - 19:00
(Please Note: Seminar will be presented in Japanese language only)

Seminar Poster Download (Available in Japanese Language only.)


Notice of Award

Published:
Oct 10, 2022

Professor Sakata-Yanagimoto received Japan Cancer Association (JCA) Mauvernay Award.



Professor Sakata-Yanagimoto of TMRC and Department of Hematology at University of Tsukuba, received the 2022 Japan Cancer Association (JCA) Mauvernay Award within the “Translational Research” catergory. Professor Sakata-Yanagimoto was recognized for her exceptional research related to “Translational research targeting intractable lymphomas.”

The Japanese Cancer Association and Debiopharm jointly established the JCA-Mauvernay Award to recognize the cutting edge oncology research and to encourage Japanese researchers to make their work available to other parts of the world.”

Read More → (from Japan Cancer Association (JCA) - External Website)

Award Information → (Japan Cancer Association (JCA) - External Website)


Notice

Published:
Oct 10, 2022

Professor Takahashi and Professor Hirokawa of TMRC have been selected to participate in the AMED-BINDS project.



“The “Basic Project for Supporting Life Science and Drug Discovery Research” is a project based on a wide range of life science-related research in Japan, with the aim of linking outstanding research results to practical research and development, such as drug discovery research. ” Read More → (BINDS Website - Available in Japanese Language Only)

Publication

Published:
30 Sept 2022

Development of an analytical method to estimate gene expression by cell-cell interaction

CCPLS reveals cell-type-specific spatial dependence of transcriptomes in single cells.

Our bodies are composed of a wide variety of cells, which interact with each other to ensure that developmental processes proceed properly and that homeostasis is maintained in tissues and organs. When this cell-cell interaction is disrupted, it can lead to disease.


On the other hand, it is known that there are genes whose expression varies from cell to cell, even within the same cell type. Many of these genes are involved in cellular functions and thus affect the function of the entire cell population and the development of disease. Although it was known in some cases that cell-cell interactions are associated with such cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, the full picture was not clear because there was no comprehensive method to examine the effects of multiple cell types on gene expression.

In this study, we developed CCPLS, an information analysis method that uses one-cell spatial transcriptome data, which simultaneously measures cell function and spatial coordinates, to estimate the effects of neighboring cells on each other's gene expression. This method estimates the relationship between the types of neighboring cell types and the resulting gene expression when focusing on a certain cell type. Evaluation experiments using simulated data have shown that CCPLS can estimate cell-cell interactions with high accuracy. In addition, specific cell-cell interactions could be extracted from examples of application to real data in the brain and colon, demonstrating the effectiveness of this method.

Journal Publication - Bioinformatics 【DOI】 10.1093/bioinformatics/btac599
      CCPLS reveals cell-type-specific spatial dependence of transcriptomes in single cells.

Research Outline (PDF In Japanese language)

Event

Published:
Posted 22 September 2022

Digital Medicine Strategy Division - Third Seminar Session


Transborder Medical Research Center

Digital Medicine Strategy Division

Online Zoom Event, October 12th, 2022 (Wednesday),
18:00 - 19:00
(Please Note: Seminar will be presented in Japanese language only)

Seminar Poster Download (Available in Japanese Language only.)


Event

Published:
Posted 27 July 2022

Digital Medicine Strategy Division - Second Seminar Session


Transborder Medical Research Center

Digital Medicine Strategy Division

Online Zoom Event, August 30th, 2022 (Tuesday),
18:00 - 19:00
(Please Note: Seminar will be presented in Japanese language only)

Seminar Poster Download (Available in Japanese Language only.)


Publication

Published:
27 July 2022

Mast4 determines the cell fate of MSCs for bone and cartilage development.

Microtubule Associated Serine/Threonine Kinase Family Member 4 (Mast4) serves as an important mediator of TGF-β and Wnt signal transduction in regulating chondro-osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Findings uncover essential roles of Mast4 in determining the fate of MSC development into cartilage or bone.

Nature Communications  
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-31697-3
Published: July 8, 2022. Volume 13, Article number: 3960 (2022)

Event

Published:
Posted 26 July 2022

Digital Medicine Strategy Division - Kickoff Seminar


*** EVENT COMPLETED ***

June 22, 2022

Transborder Medical Research Center

Digital Medicine Strategy Division

Seminar Poster Download (Available in Japanese Language only.)

*** EVENT COMPLETED ***